Isle of Man Steam Packet

The Isle of Man Steam Packet Company is the only ferry operator linking the UK, the Isle of Man and Ireland.

Book Isle of Man Steam Packet today with cheap4ferries.com – all Isle of Man Steam Packet routes are available to book, from Liverpool, Dublin, Isle of Man, Heysham and Belfast.

The Isle Of Man Steam Packet Company is the oldest continually operating passenger ferry service in the world, having started in the year 1830 and today they offer services with convenient and fast crossing times to the travelling public. Fast ferries and conventional vessels make up a modern fleet providing excellent on board service. A year-round service for passengers, vehicles (including coaches) and freight operates between Heysham and the Isle of Man. Twice daily services are operated by the Ben-my-Chree. Additional fast craft operate a 2 hour crossing at peak times during the summer months. Great for the Isle of Man TT! Take a ferry to the Isle of Man.

Isle of Man Steam Packet - Routes

Timetables Number of Crossings Duration
Heysham - Isle of Man up to 3 per Day approx. 3 hrs 30 mins
Isle of Man - Heysham up to 3 per Day approx. 3 hrs 30 mins
Belfast - Isle of Man up to 3 per Week approx. 2 hrs 45 mins
Isle of Man - Belfast up to 3 per Week approx. 2 hrs 45 mins
Timetables Number of Crossings Duration
Liverpool - Isle of Man up to 2 per Week approx. 4 hrs 15 mins
Isle of Man - Liverpool up to 2 per Week approx. 4 hrs 15 mins
Dublin - Isle of Man up to 2 per Week approx. 2 hrs 45 mins
Isle of Man - Dublin up to 2 per Week approx. 2 hrs 55 mins

Isle of Man Steam Packet - Find out more

What does my Isle of Man Steam Packet crossing price include?
The price you are quoted is for all passengers in your vehicle including the driver.
Is a cabin included?
There is a choice of Lounge seats, First Class Seats or cabins for overnight crossings.

Isle of Man Steam Packet - Ports

About the Isle of Man

The capital of the Isle of Man is Douglas. Home to the ferry terminal and the main centre of population, Douglas has a large range of hotels, B&Bs, pubs, restaurants and shops. Other big towns on the island include Castletown, Onchan, Peel, Port Erin, Port St Mary and Ramsey.

History and heritage

For the history buff, the Isle of Man has thousands of years worth of history, myth and legend crammed into every corner of it's 220 square miles, and archaeological research into the islands' prehistoric "round mounds" is uncovering new information about early inhabitants to this day. The Isle of Man's famous three-legged flag symbol, known as the "triskelion" is thought to be derived from an ancient pagan sun sign was first used in the 14th Century on the Manx Sword of State. The Latin motto around it, "Quocunque Jeceris Stabit" means "whichever way you throw me, I stand", reflective of the independent spirit of the Manx, the local name for people from the island and their language. One story ascribes the motto to the island's ancient sea god, Manannan, who turned himself into the "Three Legs"; in some versions of the legend it was his last act of defiance against St Patrick.

Castles

One of the two main castles to visit on the Isle of Man is Castle Rushen, built in the 13th Century it is one of the best preserved castles of its type anywhere in the world. You don't have to be Tony Robinson to work out why the castle was built where it is: right on the mouth of the river, commanding panoramic views out to sea. The castle has been the home of the Kings and Lords of Mann, a fortress, a mint and even a prison. Just 10 miles from Douglas, the castle is situated on Castle Street and is the historic centre of Castletown.

On the other side of the island, but still just 12 miles from Douglas, in yet another perfect strategic location is Peel Castle, the Isle of Man’s other great fortress. Older monastic buildings from the time of the Celts occupied the land, but the area was originally fortified by the Viking Magnus Barefoot. The original fortification was built in wood, with the majority of the walls and towers being built in local red sandstone in the early 14th century.

The Great Laxey Wheel

Nicknamed "Lady Isabella" by locals after the wife of island's Governor of the time, the Great Laxey Wheel offers spectacular views of the Laxey Valley from a viewing platform at the top. Designed by Victorian engineer Robert Casement towards the end of the Industrial Revolution, the giant wheel started turning in 1854 to pump water from the Laxey mines. It’s the largest working waterwheel in the world, and an impressive sight to this day.

The Isle of Man Steam Railway

Another stunning example of Victorian Engineering is the Isle of Man Steam Railway. Originally opened in 1874, this narrow gauge railway today runs its original engines and carriages, to a choice of destinations on the south of the Island, including Castle Rushen, the Old House of Keys and the Nautical Museum and Rushen Abbey in Castletown, all within walking distance of the station. Further on are several beautiful sandy beaches, and the Isle of Man Steam Railway Museum at Port Erin, opened in 1975. The Steam Railway is a unique experience, offering views of the stunning Manx countryside all around.

The Isle of Man TT races

Possibly the most famous motorbike event in the world, The Isle of Man TT (Tourist Trophy) Race is a motorcycle time trial event on public roads, which are closed specially for the race, held annually on the Isle of Man in May or June each year. Considered by enthusiasts to be the ultimate test of nerves and speed for man and machine, the race has been held on the island since 1907 and is hugely popular with people across the world. Our advice is to do your research and book as early as you can - the Isle of Man and all it's hotels and ferries are never so busy as when the races are on.